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Differential radiation sensitivity to morphological, functional and molecular changes of human thyroid tissues and bone marrow cells maintained in SCID mice

Taisei, Nomura and Mukh, Syaifudin (2008) Differential radiation sensitivity to morphological, functional and molecular changes of human thyroid tissues and bone marrow cells maintained in SCID mice. Mutation Research/Genetic Toxicology and Environmental Mutagenesis, 657. pp. 68-76.

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Abstract

Morphology and function of human organs and tissues are well maintained in the improved SCID (severe combined immunodeficient) mice for a long period (∼3 years). To study the radiation-induced damage on human thyroid gland, human thyroid tissues transplanted to SCID mice were consecutively exposed to Xrays or 137Cs -rays at high and low dose rates for approximately 2 years. Consecutive irradiation resulted in the disappearance of follicles and significant decrease of thyroid hormone secretion. Mutations in p53 and c-kit genes were induced significantly in human thyroid tissues from old head and neck cancer patients (av. 56.8 years, 4 males) and a Graves’ disease patient (20 years, male) over the dose of 24 Gy (44.7 ± 5.9 Gy, mean ± S.E) and 11 Gy (20.2 ± 7.8 Gy), respectively, while mutations were not detected at lower doses nor in unexposed matched controls (p < 0.01). There were significant differences in mutation frequency in the transplanted human thyroid tissues (31 years, female) between high dose rate (1.19 Gy/min; 8 in 20 tissues) and low dose rate (0.00023 Gy/min; 0 in 14 tissues) exposures (p < 0.01). Mutations were not detected in RET, K-ras and ˇ-catenin genes. Expression analysis by GeneChip indicated that gene expression was also well maintained in the transplanted human thyroid tissues. However, lower doses (1 or 3 Gy) of 137Cs - rays can induce changes in gene expression in the transplanted human thyroid tissues. Furthermore, fatally irradiated SCID mice could survive with human bone marrow cell transplantation. When about half of mouse bone marrows were replaced by human bone marrow cells, the human bone marrow cells showed high sensitivity to -irradiation; 28.0% and 0.45% survival after 0.5 and 2.0 Gy exposures, respectively

Item Type: Article
Subjects: Keselamatan dan Keamanan Nuklir > Keselamatan Radiasi dan Kesehatan kerja
Divisions: Pusat Teknologi Keselamatan dan Metrologi Radiasi
Depositing User: USER PTKMR BATAN
Date Deposited: 11 Sep 2018 22:39
Last Modified: 11 Sep 2018 22:39
URI: http://repo-nkm.batan.go.id/id/eprint/3899

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